More Old Fairy Tales and How to Level Up Your Game

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Yesterday, as part of my analysis of what makes Grimm the strongest ruler in Force of Will, I reminisced about some of the fairy tale resonators from Grimm and Alice Clusters. I specifically talked about the Holy Fairy Tale Trifecta of Cheshire Cat, Tinker Bell, and Hunter in the Black Forest, while I also brought up the crazy ramp of Gretel and the beatstick extraordinaire Hamelin’s Pied Piper. I closed out that argument saying we’d look at the other fairy tales that showed up in the 2015-2016 meta.

Anyway, just for reference, here are the other articles in the series thus far:

  1. Revisiting Grimm
  2. The Old Fairy Tales

To the fairy tales!

  1. Rapunzel, the Long-Haired Princess: Not only was Rapunzel possibly a stronger win-condition than Piper and Tinker Bell combined, she was also the ultimate teaching tool for new players to level up their game. I’ll explain:

    Rapnuzel is a 600/600 fairy tale resonator for LL1, which by today’s standards isn’t great. Rapunzel doesn’t recover normally during your recovery phase, but you can rest another reso you control to recover Rapunzel. Additionally, you can rest her to give a resonator +200/+200 and flying.

    So what was I saying about leveling up your game? Well, look at it like this:

      • [Level 0] At base, Rapunzel is a 600/600 that doesn’t recover and can buff something. Bad.
      • [Level 1] Remember that this is Force of Will. You can do things before your recover step, such as use Rapunzel to buff a resonator, and then rest another resonator to recover her. Rinse and repeat until your whole team has +200/+0 and flying for the turn. Not bad.
      • [Level 2] Here’s where things get really fun. In Force of Will, you can attack with a resonator as long as you’ve controlled it since the start of your turn and it is recovered. This means you can attack with Rapunzel, rest a reso, recover Rapunzel, and attack again. You can keep attacking so long as you have spare resonators to rest. Better.
      • [Level 3] Combine everything. Before your recover step, rest Rapunzel to give herself +200/+0 and flying. If you have any other recovered resonators, use them to recover Rapunzel and have her buff herself more. It doesn’t matter if you make her recover before or after the recovery step. Now Rapunzel has 600+(200*n) ATK with flying that can attack multiple times in a turn. Great!
        • Let’s say you have 2 Cheshire Cats and a Rapunzel (easy to do in a Grimm deck). Before recovery, you pop Rapunzel thrice. Recover everything but Rapunzel. Rest a cat to recover her now. You get to attack for 1000 twice in the air.
      • [Level +1] Don’t forget that Rapunzel’s recover ability gets around “summoning sickness”. You can rest resonators the turn you play them to recover Rapunzel.

    Rapunzel is a deceptively deep, skill-intensive card that is both a wonderful win condition and a great learning tool for new players to up their game.

     

  2. Oz, the Great Wizard: Oz is a relatively simple resonator to examine. He just grabs a spell card that costs 1 from your deck when he enters play.

    If you grab Oz’s Magic, you can cast it for free. I just always grabbed Thunder.

    All in all, just a decent dude to have. If you didn’t need to tutor up burn, you could always pitch him to Grimm for a Cheshire Cat or something else.

  3. Glinda, the Fairy: Here’s a great card! Glinda only costs two Will, but you’re getting two great abilities on a decent body. When Glinda enters play, you can make a resonator unblockable for the turn.

    This combos quite well with Tinker Bell, the Spirit (Tink 1.0) as she also gets stronger from Glinda being in play. On top of all of this, you can banish Glinda to cancel a normal spell unless Opp can pay an addition 2 Will for it. This protects your resonators from removal, as well as other unfavorable cards that Opp might play. Glinda’s key role is a support resonator. She helps keep your resonators out of danger in combat and keeps them safe from spells.

  4. Etna, the Snow Queen: Where Pied Piper could lock down a resonator upon entering play, and lock down an additional resonator when he attacked, Etna can just flat out lock down as many resonators as you can pay for when you cast her.

    As an additional cost when casting Etna, you can pay X to rest X resonators and keep them rested so long as Etna lives. This was a great way to squeeze damage through a board of blockers, while at the same time could be used defensively to freeze a big threat. On top of all that versatility, Opp has to discard a card whenever Etna hits them. She’s also a 700/700. Great card.

     

  5. Little Red, the Hope of Millennia and Granny, by the Fireplace: Here’s a fun combo! Little Red the Hope of Millennia (aka ANOTHER LITTLE RED?) is only a 200/200 for 1, but you can pay an extra Fire Will to go search for a “Granny” card and put it into play. There’s only one granny in Force of Will, and that’s the Granny by the Fireplace.

    Upon initial inspection, Granny is merely just a weak old lady with a huge butt to stay back on defense. Don’t forget about having Tinker Bell, though! For two will, you’re getting two resonators in this combo. Not bad, but not as good as having a Cheshire Cat and something else on turn 2. Little Red also has a burn ability if you discard an “Apple” card. With the way I run Grimm, this is actually a relevant ability. I’ll get to that in another article in this series, though.

  6. The Little Prince: Here’s a fairy tale that I never saw a single other person play, but I found him quite the powerhouse.

    He’s a base 200/200 for 2 Will, but he gets bigger depending on having resonators with different costs. If you played Tink on turn 1, and TLP on turn 2, he’d be a 600/600 immediately. On turn 3, if you got a 3-drop in the mix, TLP would be a 1000/1000. He made a great early-game beatstick. He also could gain you back a quarter of your life if you were in a bad spot. The Little Prince wasn’t necessarily the best turn 2 play, but if you curved out properly, he still put in work.

Well, that’s basically all the noteworthy fairy tales from the old meta! Did I miss one you liked? Let me know in the comments!

COME BACK NEXT TIME FOR A LOOK AT SOME POPULAR GRIMM DECKS FROM THE OLDEN DAYS OF FORCE OF WILL!

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Owner, operator, and editor-in-chief of GrinningRemnant. Alex has been playing TCGs since 2000 when he picked up Magic: The Gathering. He started playing Force of Will back in February 2015 and has been hooked ever since.

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